Posts Tagged ‘Chrysalis’

This is by no means a definitive science fiction film collection, but it offers a well-rounded sampling of the genre from the 1980’s and 2000’s. The 12 films gathered by Anchor Bay Entertainment comes in standardized, shiny packaging that makes a bold statement about your good taste when displayed together.

Android, directed by Aaron Lipstadt (1982)
In the outskirts of deep space orbits ULZ-53, a forgotten research station manned only by intense scientist Dr. Daniel (Klaus Kinski) and his lonely android assistant Max 404 (Don Keith Opper). But when three escaped convicts, including a beautiful woman, arrive aboard, Dr. Daniel finds the missing element to his outlawed experiments while Max discovers his own forbidden urges.
Special features: commentary by Lipstadt and writer/actor Opper

Astro Boy: Greatest Astro Adventures
When a brilliant robot engineer named Dr. Boynton loses his son Toby in a tragic accident, the dedicated but heartbroken scientist uses his technical skills to construct a robot in the boy’s image. This is the first Astro Boy series created in full colour, showcasing the importance of kindness, compassion and selflessness in the face of life’s obstacles.

Black Moon Rising, directed by Harley Cokliss (1986)
When master thief Sam Quint (Tommy Lee Jones) is hired by the government to steal top-secret data from a crime organization, he hides the stolen data in The Black Moon, an experimental supercar. But when the car is stolen by high-tech car thief Nina (Linda Hamilton), Quint must steal it back from an impenetrable skyscraper.

Chrysalis, directed by Julien Leclercq (2009)
Paris 2025: a tough cop (Albert Dupontel) is haunted by a murder he could not stop; a young woman (Marthe Keller) is scarred by a dark secret from her past; and a killer with a taste for sadism is on the loose. All of this takes place in a city where sleek technology is stained with a conspiracy of violence and corruption. The visuals are eye-popping with shocking twists and explosive action scenes, merging to create a unique futuristic crime thriller.
Special features: a making of featurette

Cyclops, directed by Roger Corman (2009)
A terrifying Cyclops is terrorizing the Roman countryside, so the corrupt emperor Tiberius sends in his strongest general, Marcus. Soon the Cyclops is captured and brought to the great city to fight as a gladiator, but the tables are quickly turned on Marcus when he has to fight as well. Bitter enemies become allies to overthrow the tyrannical power.

Dead Space: Downfall (2007)
The story follows a select group of miner and crewmembers as they are confronted with an evil like none ever encountered by man. When a deep space mining operation discovers a mysterious alien marker, they believe they have finally found evidence of our creators. However, the removal of the marker unleashes a horrific alien species that was entombed within the remote planet. The feature-length animated movie is a prequel to the EA game.
Special features: deleted scenes and cheat codes

Lightspeed, from executive producer Stan Lee (2007)
The covert world of government ‘Ghost Squad’ agent Daniel Leight (Jason Connery) comes crashing down when he is critically injured in a building collapse triggered by the genetically mutated terrorist Python (Daniel Goddard). But when Leight’s radiation treatments are sabotaged, he discovers that he has the ability to move at hyper speeds only by risking potentially fatal metabolic damage.

The Man from Earth, written by Jerome Bixby (2007)
On a cold night in a remote cabin, Professor John Oldman (David Lee Smith) gathers his most trusted colleagues for an extraordinary announcement: he is an immortal who has migrated through 140 centuries of evolution and must now move on. These scientists and scholars are now forced to confront their notions of history, religion and humanity, all leading to a final revelation that may shatter their world forever.
Special features: commentary with director Richard Schenkman and actor John Billingsley; commentary with executive producer Emerson Bixby and author/sci-fi scholar Gary Westfahl; and four original behind the scenes featurette

Masters of Science Fiction (2007)
From the beginning, we have struggled to understand time, matter and the infinite universe: who we are, where we are headed, and if we are alone. Professor Stephen Hawking hosts expeditions into the outer realms of scientific imagination as the genre’s most legendary writers and directors provide wonderful and terrifying answers to these questions. The collection features all six episodes of the acclaimed series, including two ‘lost’ episodes never broadcast during its original network run.

Philadelphia Experiment, executive producer John Carpenter (1984)
The experiment that should never have happened 41 years ago is still going on. Philadelphia, 1943: a top-secret experiment is underway to make U.S. Navy ships invisible to enemy radar, but something goes horribly wrong and the Battleship Eldridge disappears. Two sailors jump overboard and are mysteriously transported 41 year into the future.

Recon 2020 & 2022, directed by Christian Viel (2004 & 2007)
Galactic Marine Infantry is the most highly trained, highly honoured and most decorated fighting force in the galaxy. They have gone up against the worst of the worst. They’re “the first to go, last to know.”

Recon 2020: the Caprini Massacre follows the squad on a recon mission to a remote planet, investigating recent reports that defy rational explanation. Once deployed on the planet surface, they begin to experience bizarre nightmares, from vampires to three-headed Hydras. But these are no ordinary bad dreams – these nightmares can kill.

Recon 2022: the Mezzo Incident chronicles a mission to an ice planet whose perils are more dangerous than just the blinding snow and constant cold. The squad encounters a city of cyborgs, while contending with giant snow worms and other bloodthirsty alien entities.

Sands of Oblivion, directed by David Flores (2008)
In 1923, legendary director Cecil B. DeMille constructed a replica of ancient Egypt in the California desert for his epic movie The Ten Commandments. When filming was completed, he mysteriously ordered the entire set buried. Now a soon-to-be-divorced archaeologist couple (Victor Webster and Adam Baldwin) and an Iraq War combat veteran (Victor Webster) have uncovered the secret DeMille could not keep hidden and unleashed a horror that cannot be stopped.

The marriage of science and technology is capable of spawning great things but how many suffer in the process of perfecting results and helping others?

It is Paris, 2025 and a surgeon no longer has to be in the same operating room as the patient to perform complex procedures. But Professor Brügen (Marthe Keller), the doctor responsible for this technology, is keeping a secret. Her daughter nearly died in a car accident – how far has she gone to preserve her daughter’s life?

In the meantime, Lt. David Hoffman (Albert Dupontel) is chasing brutal murderer Dimitri Nicolav (Alain Figlarz) and will not let anything stand in his way of capturing him. Hoffman’s colleagues do not trust him and his new partner does not understand him.

Another girl has been found dead and her sister is still missing; meanwhile, victims of experimentation are surfacing with no memory prior to their discovery – the two are connected and Nicolav is somehow involved; it is up to Hoffman to connect the dots.

Director Julien Leclercq incorporates a twist on one of the key characteristics of film noir in the color of Chrysalis: instead of black and grey, it is blue and white. Still, the skies are dark, conspiracies run deep and women are dangerous; however, little else of Chrysalis is Chandler-esque.

On the contrary, the film began as a remake and evolved into an homage to Georges Franju’s 1960 masterpiece, Les yeux sans visage (Eyes without a Face). Although the plots are similar, the filmmakers changed the nature of the experiment being conducted.

Along with these elements, there is also a hint of some cyberpunk elements in the film. The technology is invasive and, simultaneously, more freeing as holograms and desks equipped with touch screens have replaced physical apparatuses. On the other hand, fans of the physical can breathe a sigh of relief, as research assured Leclercq actual newspapers would still be sold in twenty years. In addition, skilful fighting abilities and the importance of memory are common traits in cyberpunk.

The fight sequences are littered with tight shots, putting audiences in the middle of the action. Dupontel only agreed to work on the project if he could perform his own stunts; therefore, he trained for six weeks with Figlarz, who also served as stunt coordinator on Bourne Identity, and afforded Leclercq the luxury of not having to hide the identity of a stunt double while shooting.

Although parts of Chrysalis may feel a little slow, the premise and obstacles to be overcome are interesting. Nonetheless, it would have benefited from a couple of additional hand-to-hand combat scenes and more of a cyberpunk atmosphere.