Posts Tagged ‘golden globes’

Christian Bale and Mark Wahlberg in The FighterThere have been several great films that revolve around physical sports. Darren Aronofsky’s The Wrestler is the most recent, but most have tended to centre on boxing – Raging Bull, Rocky and Million Dollar Baby to name a few – and now The Fighter will join their ranks. With six Golden Globe nominations and various other accolades even before its theatrical release, this film lives up to all the hype and acclaim. (more…)

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The Wrestler is an honest, gritty look at what happens to the superstars of wrestling entertainment once the cameras and spotlights no longer smile down upon them. It’s also been a matter of hot topic in recent WWE shows featuring Chris Jericho.

Twenty years ago, Randy “The Ram” Robinson (Mickey Rourke) was an alpha dog in the world of wrestling. He was one of the good guys everyone could look up to and he finished off all his opponents with a “Ram Jam” from the top ropes. Now, crowds of a hundred chant his name as he beats idolizing unknowns in the amateur ring and sits among the other aged athletes at barely attended autograph sessions. A heart attack brought on by decades of abusing his body causes Randy to re-evaluate what’s important in his life. As a result, he attempts to transcend his business-only relationship with a stripper (Marisa Tomei) and tries to mend his relationship with his daughter (Evan Rachel Wood).

Anyone who raised a wrestler to the status of hero when they were young will appreciate this behind-the-curtain look at the difficult choices and hardships these men face. Some parts are hard to watch even though we’ve seen the performance side of it countless times. A well-written, tragic script effectively pulls and drags at your heartstrings without feeling exaggerated or unreal. The downside is you may never look at a wrestling match as carefree again.

Rourke turns in a career resurrecting performance. Sin City put his name back on our lips, but this put it in our hearts and mind. Even though Rourke did not win the Oscar, the buzz and attention around this picture are well-earned. Rourke infuses “The Ram” with the charisma, energy and heart that these athletes addicted to the roar of the crowd bring to the show. On the flipside, he plays the beaten man trying to find his way to heart-wrenching perfection. Tomei also brings her A-game, portraying a woman past her prime in an industry that repels reality and values youth.

Director Darren Aronofsky doesn’t attach his usual bells and whistles to the movie’s appearance; instead, he lets the story speak for itself through drained colours and an unpolished look. Any other choice would have detracted from the chronicle.

Sadly, the only special feature included with a film of this calibre is the music video for Bruce Springsteen’s Golden Globe-winning title song “The Wrestler.”


Last night’s red carpet showed recession chic is not in style yet. The women were gorgeous in long gowns that steered clear of over the top but were not too simple either.

Slumdog Millionaire was the big winner of the night. A.R. Rahman took best original score against Clint Eastwood; Simon Beaufoy snagged best screenplay for his adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s Q&A; and Danny Boyle took home the honour of best director.

Kate Winslet was the other big winner of the night taking home statues for both her nominations: best supporting actress in The Reader and best actress in Revolutionary Road.

The two most anticipated and predicted categories of the night were both male. As expected, Heath Ledger was posthumously awarded best supporting actor for his role as The Joker in The Dark Night. After a standing ovation, director Chris Nolan accepted the award on Ledger’s behalf. “All of us who worked with Heath on The Dark Night accept this with an awful mixture of sadness, but incredible pride.” While Nolan said Ledger’s passing represented “a hole ripped in the history of cinema,” he also noted “the incredible place in the history of cinema that he built for himself.” Nolan ended his remarks by saying, “He will be eternally missed, but he will never be forgotten.”

The other expected hopeful was awarded, as best actor went to Mickey Rourke for his outstanding performance in The Wrestler. And although the actor’s attire was a little unconventional, his acceptance speech was traditionally heartfelt. Bruce Springsteen also took best original song for “The Wrestler.”

The complete list of film winners for the 66th annual Golden Globe Awards:

Best motion picture drama
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
“Frost/Nixon”
The Reader
“Revolutionary Road”
Slumdog Millionaire” (Winner)

Best motion picture musical or comedy
Burn After Reading
“Happy-Go-Lucky”
In Bruges
“Mamma Mia!”
“Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (Winner)

Best actor, drama
Leonardo DiCaprio, “Revolutionary Road”
Frank Langella, “Frost/Nixon”
Sean Penn, “Milk”
Brad Pitt, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
Mickey Rourke, “The Wrestler” (Winner)

Best actress, drama
Anne Hathaway, “Rachel Getting Married”
Angelina Jolie, “Changeling”
Meryl Streep, “Doubt
Kristin Scott Thomas, “I’ve Loved You So Long”
Kate Winslet, “Revolutionary Road” (Winner)

Best actor, musical or comedy
Javier Bardem, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”
Colin Farrell, “In Bruges” (Winner)
James Franco, “Pineapple Express
Brendan Gleeson, “In Bruges
Dustin Hoffman, “Last Chance Harvey”

Best actress in a musical or comedy
Kristen Bell, “Forgetting Sarah Marshall”
Sally Hawkins, “Happy-Go-Lucky” (Winner)
Frances McDormand, “Burn After Reading
Meryl Streep, “Mamma Mia!”
Emma Thompson, “Last Chance Harvey”

Best supporting actor in a motion picture
Tom Cruise, “Tropic Thunder”
Robert Downey Jr., “Tropic Thunder”
Ralph Fiennes, “The Duchess”
Philip Seymour Hoffman, “Doubt
Heath Ledger, “The Dark Knight” (Winner)

Best supporting actress in a motion picture
Amy Adams, “Doubt
Penelope Cruz, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”
Viola Davis, “Doubt
Marisa Tomei, “The Wrestler
Kate Winslet, “The Reader” (Winner)

Best director, motion picture
Danny Boyle, “Slumdog Millionaire” (Winner)
Stephen Daldry, “The Reader
David Fincher, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
Ron Howard, “Frost/Nixon”
Sam Mendes, “Revolutionary Road

Best screenplay, motion picture
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” Eric Roth, Robin Swicord
Doubt,” John Patrick Shanley
“Frost/Nixon,” Peter Morgan
The Reader,” David Hare
Slumdog Millionaire,” Simon Beaufoy (Winner)

Best original song, motion picture
“Bolt” (“I Thought I Lost You”)
“Cadillac Records” (“Once in a Lifetime”)
“Gran Torino” (“Gran Torino”)
“WALL-E” (“Down to Earth”)
“The Wrestler” (“The Wrestler“) (Winner)

Best original score, motion picture
“Changeling,” Clint Eastwood
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” Alexandre Desplat
“Defiance,” James Newton Howard
“Frost/Nixon,” Hans Zimmer
Slumdog Millionaire,” A.R. Rahman (Winner)

Best animated film
“Bolt”
“Kung Fu Panda”
“WALL-E” (Winner)

Best foreign-language film
“The Baader Meinhof Complex”
“Maria Larssons eviga ogonblick”
“Gomorra”
“I’ve Loved You So Long”
“Waltz With Bashir” (Winner)


It’s that time of year again. Where the Golden Globes are, Oscars are just around the corner. And one has been known to foretell the results of the other. However, this year’s nominations did not cause surprise by who was included, but rather by who was ignored.

Frost/Nixon, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Doubt were propelled to front-runner position with five nominations each, the two former receiving nods for best dramatic picture. Unsurprisingly, Mickey Rourke is listed in the best dramatic actor category for The Wrestler, while Heath Ledger got the best dramatic supporting actor nomination for his final role as The Joker in The Dark Knight (the film’s only nomination).

But no amount of searching will locate the names of what were assumed to be Oscar shoo-ins. Australia and Globes darling Nicole Kidman received zilch, which greatly lowers Academy hopes. The critically acclaimed Milk, a biopic starring Sean Penn, only received a single nod for the film’s star. Even Clint Eastwood will have to settle for musical nominations, having been left out of the directing and acting categories.

On the other hand, this years nominations spread the love around with no one film dominating all the categories. Here is the film nomination list:

Best motion picture drama
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
“Frost/Nixon”
The Reader
“Revolutionary Road”
Slumdog Millionaire

Best motion picture musical or comedy
Burn After Reading
“Happy-Go-Lucky”
In Bruges
“Mamma Mia!”
“Vicky Cristina Barcelona”

Best actor, drama
Leonardo DiCaprio, “Revolutionary Road”
Frank Langella, “Frost/Nixon”
Sean Penn, “Milk”
Brad Pitt, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
Mickey Rourke, “The Wrestler

Best actress, drama
Anne Hathaway, “Rachel Getting Married”
Angelina Jolie, “Changeling”
Meryl Streep, “Doubt
Kristin Scott Thomas, “I’ve Loved You So Long”
Kate Winslet, “Revolutionary Road”

Best actor, musical or comedy
Javier Bardem, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”
Colin Farrell, “In Bruges
James Franco, “Pineapple Express
Brendan Gleeson, “In Bruges
Dustin Hoffman, “Last Chance Harvey”

Best actress in a musical or comedy
Kristen Bell, “Forgetting Sarah Marshall”
Sally Hawkins, “Happy-Go-Lucky”
Frances McDormand, “Burn After Reading
Meryl Streep, “Mamma Mia!”
Emma Thompson, “Last Chance Harvey”

Best supporting actor in a motion picture
Tom Cruise, “Tropic Thunder”
Robert Downey Jr., “Tropic Thunder”
Ralph Fiennes, “The Duchess”
Philip Seymour Hoffman, “Doubt
Heath Ledger, “The Dark Knight”

Best supporting actress in a motion picture
Amy Adams, “Doubt
Penelope Cruz, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”
Viola Davis, “Doubt
Marisa Tomei, “The Wrestler
Kate Winslet, “The Reader

Best director, motion picture
Danny Boyle, “Slumdog Millionaire
Stephen Daldry, “The Reader
David Fincher, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
Ron Howard, “Frost/Nixon”
Sam Mendes, “Revolutionary Road

Best screenplay, motion picture
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” Eric Roth, Robin Swicord
Doubt,” John Patrick Shanley
“Frost/Nixon,” Peter Morgan
The Reader,” David Hare
Slumdog Millionaire,” Simon Beaufoy

Best original song, motion picture
“Bolt” (“I Thought I Lost You”)
“Cadillac Records” (“Once in a Lifetime”)
“Gran Torino” (“Gran Torino”)
“WALL-E” (“Down to Earth”)
“The Wrestler” (“The Wrestler“)

Best original score, motion picture
“Changeling,” Clint Eastwood
“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” Alexandre Desplat
“Defiance,” James Newton Howard
“Frost/Nixon,” Hans Zimmer
Slumdog Millionaire,” A.R. Rahman

Best animated film
“Bolt”
“Kung Fu Panda”
“WALL-E”

Best foreign-language film
“The Baader Meinhof Complex”
“Maria Larssons eviga ogonblick”
“Gomorra”
“I’ve Loved You So Long”
“Waltz With Bashir”

Golden Globe awardThe lavish ceremony was cancelled but the Hollywood Foreign Press Association persevered, still announcing the award winners via the NBC Golden Globe “Winners’ Special,” a live-telecast from the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The subdued show was hosted by Nancy O’Dell and Billy Bush, whose comments on winners and losers were inane and unsolicited.

[Ed. note: The U.S. ratings reflected that, too, with 5.8 million tuning in to the bare-bones broadcast — just a quarter of the award show’s typical average audience]

With most networks only now running out of new material to air, this was the first major effect of the Writers Guild’s strike to really hit viewers at home. And it sucked. It just was not the same without the glitz and glamour of red carpets and star power; the sappy, long, emotional acceptance speeches; and the shots of graceful losers applauding. The thought of the Oscars suffering the same fate is unbearable.

Nonetheless, despite the anti-climactic reveals, there were some clear winners and some surprise losers (ahem… Juno going 0 for 3):