Posts Tagged ‘Jane Lynch’

This week’s releases include: a martial arts picture; a unique love story; the most recent season of TV’s most popular comedy; the sophomore season of a high school musical; an intriguing family drama; a documentary about a long, sci-fi debate; a woman ascends above her “station”; the fight for abnormal protection continues; a gladiator thrives to meet his goal; a pair of brothers battle evil to save their souls; a couple of real-life friends go on a voyage; and the beginning of the mutant war is revealed. (more…)

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Kristen Wiig, Nick Frost and Simon Pegg in a scene from PaulThe attraction so many feel towards this film has a simple motivation: its pair of geek celebrity stars, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. The writing/acting duo first captured our attentions in the breakout zombie romantic comedy Shaun of the Dead, and then they maintained them with their followup, Hot Fuzz. The trailers for their third film, Paul, looked promising and it won’t disappoint. The guys take their fandom to a new level of dedication and hilarity – the stoner alien is simply a bonus. (more…)

This week’s releases include: a re-release of an acclaimed, inspiring classic; a computer-animated video game tie-in; a ghost story driven by love and loyalty; the final chapter in a thrilling trilogy; the second instalment of a music sensation; a French-Canadian lycan period piece; the reunion of a retired group of special agents; and an impressive display of skill in a dance competition. (more…)

Glee has taken television audiences by storm. With two soundtracks featuring music performed by the cast and a growing number of awards under their belt, the untraditional concept is paying off more than anyone could have dreamed.

William McKinley High School once had a champion glee club, but now the school is ruled by an uncaring gym teacher (Jane Lynch) and her cheerleaders. Seeing an opportunity for a return to glory, Spanish teacher Will Schuester (Matthew Morrison) revives the glee club and vows to transform the rag-tag group of outcasts and popular athletes into champion singers and dancers.

Though they try to infuse the show with all kinds of teen drama, like pregnancy, unrequited love and homosexuality, the storyline’s main purpose still appears to be to get from one musical number to the next. The events are not new, but the writers and actors portraying the characters have managed to create unique, and more importantly interesting, personalities. Each kid can still be categorized by a stereotype, but they make it work.

The group’s covers of such an array of music are the real heart of the show. What makes it work is the real vocal talent of the cast. They have yet to truly ruin a song through their rendition (and hopefully will continue to refrain from doing so). It’s also refreshing that they do not restrict their choices to current music or just one genre. The accompanying dance sequences are usually pretty simple, but they’re not supposed to be professionals – they’re high school students.

The special features are on the fourth disc and include: “Welcome to McKinley!”, a tour by principal Figgins (Iqbal Theba); a music video; Rachel’s and Mercedes’ full-length audition pieces; the show’s casting session presented by Fox Movie Channel; “Deconstructing Glee with [creator] Ryan Murphy”; “Dance Boot Camp”; two short features about Lynch; video diaries from various cast members; and “Things you Didn’t Know About” Jayma Mays (Emma), Cory Monteith (Finn), Amber Riley (Mercedes) and Chris Colfer (Kurt).


Oscar predictions are swirling and one of this film’s stars is in the middle of all the talk.

Julia Child (Meryl Streep) is famous for changing the way people ate in North America with a French cookbook written for Americans in 1961. Julie and Julia shows Child as she arrived in Paris, desperately seeking a hobby to occupy her time while her husband Paul (Stanley Tucci) was at work. Not taking to hat making or bridge, Paul suggests she take cooking lessons at Le Cordon Bleu. Child flourishes despite the head of the school’s distaste for her. About 40 years later, Julie Powell (Amy Adams) finds herself in a rut, so she decides to cook her way through her idol’s 524 recipes in one year. The writer in Powell leads to her to record the ups and downs of each day in a blog.

Running a little over two hours, the movie feels a little long; however, the unessential parts are mostly the sections about Powell. Streep’s portrayal of Child is so energetic and engaging, Adams’ Powell tends to fall flat in comparison. In addition, Powell’s bland yet slightly neurotic personality is not nearly as captivating.

Streep is magnificent as Child, who was quite the interesting character. She’s likeable, funny and a little odd. The other highly enjoyable element in the film is the blissful, loving relationship between Child and her husband. Their relationship is supportive and they complement each other perfectly. What this means is both Streep and Tucci deliver wonderful performances.

Similarly, there is nothing actually wrong with Adams’ acting; rather, she is simply lost in the shadow of Streep/Child. Her scenes pale in comparison to Child’s and she is not nearly as captivating. Furthermore, her drab appearance detracts from her usually warm personality.

The special features include: commentary with writer/director Nora Ephron and “Secret Ingredients,” the making of Julie and Julia.


While the film is lively and enjoyable, the statement is only really true for half of the movie.

Julia Child (Meryl Streep) is famous for changing the way people ate in North America with a French cookbook written for Americans in 1961. Julie and Julia shows Child as she arrived in Paris, desperately seeking a hobby to occupy her time while her husband Paul (Stanley Tucci) was at work. Not taking to hat making or bridge, Paul suggests she take cooking lessons at Le Cordon Bleu. Child flourishes despite the head of the school’s distaste for her. About 40 years later, Julie Powell (Amy Adams) finds herself in a rut, so she decides to cook her way through her idol’s 524 recipes in one year. The writer in Powell leads to her to record the ups and downs of each day in a blog.

Running a little over two hours, the movie feels a little long; however, the unessential parts are mostly the sections about Powell. Streep’s portrayal of Child is so energetic and engaging, Adams’ Powell tends to fall flat in comparison. In addition, Powell’s bland yet slightly neurotic personality is not nearly as captivating.

Streep is magnificent as Child, who was quite the interesting character. She’s likeable, funny and a little odd. The other highly enjoyable element in the film is the blissful, loving relationship between Child and her husband. Their relationship is supportive and they complement each other perfectly. What this means is both Streep and Tucci deliver wonderful performances.

Similarly, there is nothing actually wrong with Adams’ acting; rather, she is simply lost in the shadow of Streep/Child. Her scenes pale in comparison to Child’s and she is not nearly as captivating. Furthermore, her drab appearance detracts from her usually warm personality.

This could have been a great movie about Julia Child; the story about Julie Powell is somewhat lost and would have been unmissed.


The spring break movie has been done numerous times; but it had yet to be done by three funny thirty-something women.

Becky (Parker Posey), Gayle (Amy Poehler) and Judi (Rachel Dratch) never did spring break in college; they were preoccupied with their terrible girl band and unpopularity. Years later the girls are given a second chance when Becky is assigned by her senator boss (Jane Lynch) to chaperone her daughter (Amber Tamblyn) in an attempt to avoid any pre-election scandals. Unbeknownst to Becky or the senator, the daughter in question is a quiet geek that only tells her mother she has crazy adventures so they can bond. On the other hand, Gayle and Judi embrace the opportunity to sow their wild oats.

It’s not often Posey portrays the mellower member of a group but put against Poehler and Dratch, she may have found it difficult to keep up. Conversely, Poehler and Dratch are expectedly over-the-top, reverting to approval-seeking bimbo and lovesick alcoholic respectively. Meanwhile, when the real teens become the focus, they’re not nearly as interesting; although the popular leader (Sophie Monk) does have her moments. In the end, it is what it is: a sometimes-funny comedy explaining being popular isn’t everything it’s cracked up to be.

The commentary with director Ryan Shiraki and Dratch is mostly anecdotal. The four additional scenes fill in some blanks and allow Poehler and Dratch more room to perform, while the gag reel is sometimes funnier than actual moments in the film More features are available via BD-Live and the second-disc contains a digital copy of the film.