Posts Tagged ‘Noomi Rapace’

This week’s releases include: a courtroom period drama; a spy thriller in two different eras; another bachelor party gone wrong; a true story of fantasy and murder; a playful tale with penguins; a look at famous hockey feuds; a consequence of ‘the wrong place, the wrong time’; an adaptation of a childhood classic; a trilogy about a young woman who takes matters into her own hands; and an historical re-enactment.  (more…)

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This week’s releases include: a re-release of an acclaimed, inspiring classic; a computer-animated video game tie-in; a ghost story driven by love and loyalty; the final chapter in a thrilling trilogy; the second instalment of a music sensation; a French-Canadian lycan period piece; the reunion of a retired group of special agents; and an impressive display of skill in a dance competition. (more…)

Noomi Rapace in The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's NestThe final chapter of Stieg Larsson’s trilogy, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, is being released in theatres just 18 months after the first film was issued. This tight turnaround is uncommon, but a welcome change of pace from the traditional multi-year wait between related features. The story of Lisbeth Salander is so compelling it’s a relief not to have to wait to see the conclusion (despite the availability of the books on which the films are based). In this picture, all of the injustices that came to light in the previous film are brought to the forefront and the depth of the conspiracy against Lisbeth is revealed. (more…)

This week’s releases spans a spectrum of genres: an early holiday issue with lots of extra goodies; an intriguing tale of murder and mystery; and an indie film about doing what’s right in life and love. (more…)

The Swedish film industry is truly beginning to make waves; last year’s critical smash was Let the Right One In and this year they’ve gotten an early start with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

Facing prison time for slander, discredited journalist Mikael Blomkvist (Michael Nyqvist) is hired by a reclusive industrialist for one last job: to solve a long, unresolved family disappearance. Forty years ago, Harriet Vanger disappeared from a family gathering on the island owned and inhabited by the powerful Vanger clan; though her body was never found, her uncle is convinced it was murder. Aided by the mysterious and troubled computer hacker, Lisbeth Salander (Noomi Rapace), Mikael links Harriet’s disappearance to a number of grotesque murders, unravelling a dark and appalling family history. Alone and not knowing who to trust, they must fight for their own survival and reveal the truth. (more…)

Dr. Giggles / Otis (Blu-ray)
Dr. Giggles makes its house call with the gone-whacko tale of a night-prowling surgeon who uses his bag of medical malpractice tricks – scalpel, saw, stomach pump – on victims.
Otis: Some guys would kill for a date and pizza – delivery guy Otis is one of them … The cute cheerleader tied up in his basement is his prom date.

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Noomi Rapace in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (photo courtesy of Alliance Films)

The Swedish film industry is truly beginning to make waves; last year’s critical smash was Let the Right One In and this year they’ve gotten an early start with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

Facing prison time for slander, discredited journalist Mikael Blomkvist (Michael Nyqvist) is hired by a reclusive industrialist for one last job: to solve a long, unresolved family disappearance. Forty years ago, Harriet Vanger disappeared from a family gathering on the island owned and inhabited by the powerful Vanger clan; though her body was never found, her uncle is convinced it was murder. Aided by the mysterious and troubled computer hacker, Lisbeth Salander (Noomi Rapace), Mikael links Harriet’s disappearance to a number of grotesque murders, unravelling a dark and appalling family history. Alone and not knowing who to trust, they must fight for their own survival and reveal the truth.

Though Lisbeth is a victim of brutal abuse, her strength is inspiring. She repeatedly reclaims the power from her oppressors, taking revenge and gaining her own form of justice. This is somewhat reminiscent of the rape-revenge films that emerged in the 1970’s. Her appearance works towards her desire to keep people at arm’s length, but it is also very representative of her personality. Rapace is casted perfectly in this role. She embodies the character, allowing audiences to cheer for and empathize with her even though they may not be able to identify with her.

The story, based on Stieg Larsson’s book of the same name, is intriguing. The film begins with a revealing and blunt introduction to Lisbeth as she is assaulted more than once but rises above it each time. Her abilities as a hacker are also showcased and undeniable. The murder mystery receives an equally gradual introduction, unveiling the bare facts and slowly submitting new, sometimes confusing, information. As the pieces of the puzzle come together, the layers of deception and horror are unbelievable.

Overall, the film can seem quite disturbing, but it is also brilliant on every level. The violence in each instance, present and past, is intense and brutal but is wholly matched by the dark genius of the film.