Posts Tagged ‘Rose Byrne’

This week’s releases include: a Roger Corman monster movie; a breathtaking documentary; a good ol’ fashioned haunting flick; a legal dilemma; a political minefield; a not-so-typical sequel;  a set of films from a legendary starlet; a collection of classic books on film; and England’s national poet recited in moving pictures. (more…)

Maya Rudolph and Kristen Wiig in a scene from BridesmaidsIt’s not often an in-your-face comedy is created specifically for women. We are usually meant to settle for romantic comedies or dramas alleviated by humour – it almost always has to have a more serious narrative as the dominant factor versus just relating a string of jokes to which women can relate. These types of movies have been produced for men for decades, but ladies get ready to flock to the theatre because it’s finally playing a comedy made just for you. (more…)

A monster from InsidiousThere hasn’t been a good, true haunting flick in a while. Most recent releases have been rehashes of ‘70s and ‘80s films, which leave little room for surprise. The genre has been longing for an injection of originality and it’s finally received a healthy dose. When it was announced the creators of Saw, director James Wan and writer Leigh Whannell, were re-teaming AND joining forces with the producers of Paranormal Activity, genre fans were shivering with anticipation. The consequence of this union is far from disappointing. The film’s telling title is Insidious, which is a word used rarely but never more aptly. (more…)

A monster from InsidiousThere hasn’t been a good, true haunting flick in a while. Most recent releases have been rehashes of ‘70s and ‘80s films, which leaves little room for surprise. The genre has been longing for an injection of originality and it’s finally received a healthy dose. When it was announced the creators of Saw, director James Wan and writer Leigh Whannell, were re-teaming AND joining forces with the producers of Paranormal Activity, genre fans were shivering with anticipation. The consequence of this union is finally ready to be seen and results are far from disappointing. The film’s telling title is Insidious, which is a word used rarely but never more aptly.

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As various television series spawn spinoffs, occasionally a movie will do something similar; it’s not a sequel, but rather a branching off to follow a different character. In Get Him to the Greek, the character is a British rocker and the source film is Forgetting Sarah Marshall.

Aaron Greenberg (Jonah Hill) exaggerated his way into his dream job at Pinnacle Records and after voicing an unpopular opinion during a brainstorming meeting, he’s given a career-making assignment. His mission: fly to London and escort the rocked out Aldous Snow (Russell Brand) to L.A.’s Greek Theatre for the first stop on a $100-million tour. But Aaron is warned by his boss (Sean ‘P. Diddy’ Combs) – do not turn your back on him. Unfortunately for Aaron, Aldous is going to make his task as difficult as possible. The next 72 hours involve bleeding drug dealers, hotel-destroying brawls, drug-addled parties and sex with random women. In between, Aldous attempts to fit reconciling with his ex-wife (Rose Byrne) and estranged father (Colm Meaney) into his schedule.

Writer/director Nicholas Stoller returns to the character that carried most of Marshall, giving him the spotlight that he previously stole. Though the first half of the film relies heavily on one-liners and crass humour while building the characters’ stories, the second half is genuinely funny. The events that take place in at Vegas hotel will still have you giggling the following day. There were more naked women than seemed necessary, but Stoller has already displayed his propensity for nudity (*see* Jason Segal in Marshall).

The comedic chops of Brand and Hill are perfectly matched. Brand is outlandish, but serious; he goes between being a selfish narcissist and lonely victim consistently and competently. Hill is often confused and exasperated; but desperate to prove he’s capable, he repeatedly bends over backwards to fulfill his duty as escort/sitter. Furthermore, the supporting cast is irreplaceable as they strengthen the comedy of all the scenes in which they appear (even Diddy is a fitting contributor).

If anything could be taken from the film, it was this: “When the world slips you a Jeffrey, stroke the furry walls.”