Posts Tagged ‘Tom Wilkinson’

This week’s releases include: a courtroom period drama; a spy thriller in two different eras; another bachelor party gone wrong; a true story of fantasy and murder; a playful tale with penguins; a look at famous hockey feuds; a consequence of ‘the wrong place, the wrong time’; an adaptation of a childhood classic; a trilogy about a young woman who takes matters into her own hands; and an historical re-enactment.  (more…)

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Jessica Chastain, Sam Worthington and Marton Csokas in a scene from The DebtThe life of a national hero is not always all interviews and roses; it can be complicated, and drenched in regrets and secrets. This is the dark paradigm explored in The Debt, based on the fictional 2007 Israeli film Ha-Hov. The partnering of an American and British production team to remake a recent Israeli picture is an anomaly, but in this case the result will hold your attention without letting go. (more…)

This week’s release is the latest adaptation of a beloved vigilante crime fighter. (more…)

Robin Wright in a scene from The ConspiratorThis year marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the American Civil War. It concluded four years later, which also commemorates the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. It’s well known the American leader was murdered by John Wilkes Booth. However, three other men and one woman were found guilty and punished for conspiring to kill the country’s leaders. The Conspirator is the untold story of their trial, which resulted in the first female execution in the U.S. (more…)

Jay Chou and Seth Rogen in The Green HornetThe Green Hornet made its debut in 1936 on a radio show in Detroit. Since then, the crime-fighting vigilantes have had numerous makeovers and been featured in film serials, a television show and comic books. The latest adaptation is an awesome feature film that lives up to any and all expectations for humour, cool gadgets and fight sequences. I can’t attest to whether it’s faithful to the versions in any of the other mediums, but I can say without a doubt that this movie can, and does, stand alone. (more…)

The Ghost Writer
When a successful British ghostwriter, The Ghost (Ewan McGregor), agrees to complete the memoirs of former British Prime Minister Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), his agent assures him it’s the opportunity of a lifetime. But the project seems doomed from the start – not the least because his predecessor on the project, Lang’s long-term aide, died in a suspicious accident. But the day after The Ghost arrives to work on the project, a former British cabinet minister accuses Lang of authorizing the illegal seizure of suspected terrorists and handing them over for torture by the CIA – a war crime. The controversy brings reporters and protesters swarming to the island mansion where Lang is staying with his wife, Ruth (Olivia Williams), and his personal assistant/mistress, Amelia (Kim Cattrall). As The Ghost works, he begins to uncover clues suggesting his predecessor may have stumbled on a dark secret linking Lang to the CIA and that somehow this information is hidden in the manuscript he left behind.

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Woody Allen made a film without Scarlett Johansson. Coincidentally, it’s quite a bit better than his last few ventures.

Ian (Ewan McGregor) is unsatisfied with his lot in life. Instead of taking over his dad’s restaurant, he’s saving to invest in American hotels. He yearns to be like his well-off, exotic uncle (Tom Wilkinson). Ian’s brother Terry (Colin Farrell) is a compulsive gambler with a steady girl. But a lucky streak gets the boys enough cash to pay off their dream boat, which they fittingly name Cassandra’s Dream after the 60-1 long shot. But quick enough they’re in over their heads – Ian needs more investment money and Terry is in major debt. Their uncle has a solution to their problems, but it means a significant moral compromise on their part.

Allen returns to providing his intriguing character examinations, as well as an illustration of the great lengths a man will go to to keep a woman that’s probably out of his league. After several disappointments (with the exception of Penélope Cruz in Vicky Cristina Barcelona), Allen has finally produced a film worthy of his time and ours.

Farrell and McGregor are wonderful; and Farrell once again displays his very competent acting chops. As they are very different people, their relationship as brothers is not based on how alike they are but on how they relate to each other, which they do in a very brotherly way. They match each other’s enthusiasm and melancholy nicely.

As with any Allen DVD release, there are no special features to evaluate.