Posts Tagged ‘Woody Harrelson’

This week’s releases include: an updated Twelfth Night; an adolescent superhero movie; an encounter with evil; a new take on the Wild West; a cat-and-mouse comedy; and an intense cop drama. (more…)

Justin Timberlake and Mila Kunis in the middle of a flash mob in Friends with BenefitsOne of the first things people say about this film is, “Didn’t this movie come out already? No Strings Attached, right?” Yes, Ashton Kutcher and Natalie Portman released a film with the same premise earlier this year. But all the things it lacked are found in Friends with Benefits. (more…)

MAY 4
Nine
The film follows the life of world famous film director Guido Contini (Daniel Day-Lewis) as he reaches a creative and personal crisis of epic proportion, while balancing the numerous women in his life; including his wife (Marion Cotillard), his mistress (Penelope Cruz), his film star muse (Nicole Kidman), his confidant and costume designer (Judi Dench), a young American fashion journalist (Kate Hudson), the whore from his youth (Stacy “Fergie” Ferguson) and his mother (Sophia Loren).

Special features include: commentary by director Rob Marshall and producer John DeLuca; “Behind the Look of Nine”; “Director Rob Marshall”; “The Choreography of ‘Be Italian’”; “The Choreography of ‘Cinema Italiano’”; “The Dancers of Nine”; “The Incomparable Daniel Day-Lewis”; “The Women of Nine”; “Making of ‘Cinema Italiano’”; and music clips: “Cinema Italiano” featuring Kate Hudson, “Take It All” featuring Marion Cotillard, and “Unusual Way” featuring Griffith Frank.

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Near escapes is what this movie is made of, but the film itself is not going to subtract from your life expectancy as long as you know to expect a cool look with minimal story.

Jackson Curtis (John Cusack) is a published writer with a failed marriage and two pre-teen kids. Dr. Adrian Helmsley (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is a geologist that discovers in 2009 the Earth’s crust is heating at an alarming rate. Charlie (Woody Harrelson) is a conspiracy theorist with a pirate radio show. It is the crossing of these characters’ paths that put the story events in motion. In 2012, the world as we know it is destroyed by massive natural disasters and the only hope of survival is a set of arks built in secret by the G8 governments.

The concept of an apocalypse in 2012 is becoming more prevalent as the year grows increasingly nearer. After we survived Y2K, the next countdown to the end began. According to ancient Mayan calendars, a rare aligning of the planets will mark the end of days December 21, 2012.

This movie is definitely king of all disaster movies as it features stunning representations of various fatal acts of nature. It’s captivating to watch as California falls out from beneath everyone’s feet, while the characters escape in a manner ideal for a 3-D motion ride. However, as the disasters continue to fill the screen they begin to lose impact.

The trailer did not do the film credit in regards to the calibre of actors involved, only featuring Cusack and the special effects. In addition to those mentioned, Thandie Newton, Danny Glover, Oliver Platt, Amanda Peet and Stephen McHattie are among the cast. And while there are many tearful moments, they all avoid the temptation to overact.

The film anchors itself in contemporary times with an assassination in the same tunnel Princess Diana perished; a speech by California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger; and the unveiling of the new Bentley. The final destination of the new civilization is an interesting choice, but the realism in needing to plan to begin again on Earth and not space is welcome. On the other hand, humanity’s dark side is exposed with the price of tickets for a place on the ark and the accommodations provided.

2012 will not disappoint the disaster movie enthusiast as it really does have it all and director and co-writer Roland Emmerich once again proves he can manipulate our world like no other.

Special features include: commentary with Emmerich and co-writer Harald Kloser; deleted scenes and an alternate ending; “Roland Emmerich: The Master of the Modern Epic”; and the music video for “Time for Miracles” by Adam Lambert.

“Nut up or shut up.” This phrase is said repeatedly before key moments in Zombieland, but it is also a good descriptive for the film because it takes every device it employs to its absurd end.

Columbus (Jesse Eisenberg) has more than 30 rules he strictly lives by in the world now overrun with zombies – they’re the reason he’s outlived most other people. Tallahassee (Woody Harrelson) only appears to have one rule: kill zombies; not just the zombies trying to eat him but all zombies wherever they may be. Together, they might just get each other killed. Wichita (Emma Stone) and her sister Little Rock (Abigail Breslin) do whatever they must to survive without regard for anyone else’s well being. Of course that disregard comes into question when they meet the guys.

Even the zombie purist can enjoy this film for the horror comedy it portrays. It doesn’t abide by a lot of the traditional rules, but most of the violations serve a comedic/entertaining purpose – it wouldn’t be as amusing if Tallahassee was running at a snail-paced zombie with a hammer and a smile. Besides, Zombieland isn’t trying to make a statement; it’s just trying to have a good time.

Eisenberg is “the other guy” that plays young men with confidence issues (see Adventureland), though he is at least as good as Michael Cera. Here, he is flawless as the somewhat uptight loner just trying to get home. Harrelson is also great as the guy who tries to “enjoy the little things,” which just happens to include destroying things whenever he feels the need. Not surprisingly, he plays the slightly unbalanced guy with balls quite well. Stone and Breslin’s sisterly bond is evident, though their relationship could easily have been interpreted as just good friends. Stone is convincing as the girl who’s trying to appear tougher than she really is, while being sexy without trying (or beauty products). Breslin looks all grown up since her breakthrough performance in Little Miss Sunshine, but her talent is almost wasted in such a small role that often has her sleeping or screaming. The cameo by Bill Murray is hilarious and the actor’s exit from the film is entirely fitting and comical.

The other element of amusement is Columbus’ rules, which guide his every move and flash across the screen when appropriate. The top three are: 1. Cardio; 2. Double tap; and 3. Beware of bathrooms. Of the 32 we are privy to, they are all practical, make logical sense and could definitely contribute to extended life during a zombie apocalypse – you may consider adding an extra page to your copy of Max Brook’s The Zombie Survival Guide.

The special features include: commentary with Harrelson, Eisenberg, director Ruben Fleischer and writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick; picture-in-picture behind the scenes track; a behind the scenes featurette; a look at transforming the United States to post-apocalypse; visual effects progression scenes; movieIQ via BD-Live; and a digital copy of the film.


“Just in the nick of time.” For the number of times you can utter this phrase during 2012, it’s a definite candidate for drinking games once the DVD is released.

Jackson Curtis (John Cusack) is a published writer with a failed marriage and two pre-teen kids. Dr. Adrian Helmsley (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is a geologist that discovers in 2009 the Earth’s crust is heating at an alarming rate. Charlie (Woody Harrelson) is a conspiracy theorist with a pirate radio show. It is the crossing of these characters’ paths that put the story events in motion. In 2012, the world as we know it is destroyed by massive natural disasters and the only hope of survival is a set of arks built in secret by the G8 governments.

The concept of an apocalypse in 2012 is becoming more prevalent as the year grows increasingly nearer. Since we survived Y2K, the next countdown to the end began. According to ancient Mayan calendars, a rare aligning of the planets will mark the end of days December 21, 2012.

This movie is definitely king of all disaster movies as it features stunning representations of various fatal acts of nature. It’s captivating to watch as California falls out from beneath everyone’s feet, while the characters escape in a manner ideal for a 3D motion ride. However, as the disasters continue to fill the screen they begin to lose impact, even becoming depressing.

The trailer does not do the film credit in regards to the calibre of actors involved, only featuring Cusack and the special effects. In addition to those mentioned, Thandie Newton, Danny Glover, Oliver Platt, Amanda Peet and Stephen McHattie are among the cast. And while there are many tearful moments, they all avoid the temptation to overact.

The film anchors itself in contemporary times with an assassination in the same tunnel Princess Diana perished; a speech by California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger; and the unveiling of the new Bentley. The final destination of the new civilization is an interesting choice, but the realism in needing to plan to begin again on Earth and not space is welcome. On the other hand, humanity’s dark side is exposed with the price of tickets for a place on the ark and the accommodations provided.

Overall, 2012 will not disappoint the disaster movie enthusiast as it really does have it all and director Roland Emmerich once again proves he can manipulate our world like no other.


“Nut up or shut up.” This phrase is said repeatedly before key moments in Zombieland, but it is also a good descriptive for the film because it takes every device it employs to its absurd end.

Columbus (Jesse Eisenberg) has more than 30 rules he strictly lives by in the world now overrun with zombies – they’re the reason he’s outlived most other people. Tallahassee (Woody Harrelson) only appears to have one rule: kill zombies; not just the zombies trying to eat him but all zombies wherever they may be. Together, they might just get each other killed. Wichita (Emma Stone) and her sister Little Rock (Abigail Breslin) do whatever they must to survive without regard for anyone else’s well being. Of course that disregard comes into question when they meet the guys.

Even the zombie purist can enjoy this film for the horror comedy it portrays. It doesn’t abide by a lot of the traditional rules, but most of the violations serve a comedic/entertaining purpose – it wouldn’t be as amusing if Tallahassee was running at a snail-paced zombie with a hammer and a smile. Besides, Zombieland isn’t trying to make a statement; it’s just trying to have a good time (and it’s not a remake).

Eisenberg is “the other guy” that plays young men with confidence issues, though he is at least as good as Michael Cera. Here he is flawless as the somewhat uptight loner just trying to get home. Harrelson is also great as the guy who tries to “enjoy the little things,” which just happens to include destroying things whenever he feels the need. Not surprisingly, he plays the slightly unbalanced guy with balls quite well. Stone and Breslin’s sisterly bond is evident, though their relationship could easily have been interpreted as just good friends too. Stone is convincing as the girl who’s trying to appear tougher than she really is, while being sexy without trying (or beauty products). Breslin looks all grown up since her breakthrough performance in Little Miss Sunshine, but her talent is almost wasted in such a small role that often has her sleeping or screaming.

A celebrity cameo (by who I can’t say, but it’s out there…or better yet, be surprised) is easily worth the price of admission. The guest appearance scenes are hilarious and the actor’s exit from the film is entirely fitting and comical.

The other element of amusement is Columbus’ rules, which guide his every move and flash across the screen when appropriate. The top three are: 1. Cardio; 2. Double tap; and 3. Beware of bathrooms. Of the 32 we are privy to, they are all practical, make logical sense and could definitely contribute to extended life during a zombie apocalypse – you may consider adding an extra page to your copy of Max Brook’s The Zombie Survival Guide.